Justice, After Troy Davis – NYTimes.com

Justice, After Troy Davis – NYTimes.com.

Op-Ed Columnist

Justice After Troy Davis

IT’S easy to see why the case of Troy Davis, the Georgia man executed last week for the 1989 killing of an off-duty police officer, became a cause célèbre for death penalty opponents. Davis was identified as the shooter by witnesses who later claimed to have been coerced by investigators. He was prosecuted and convicted based on the same dubious eyewitness testimony, rather than forensic evidence. And his appeals process managed to be ponderously slow without delivering anything like certainty: it took the courts 20 years to say a final no to the second trial that Davis may well have deserved.

[…]

This [the fear of executing the innocent] is a healthy fear for a society to have. But there’s a danger here for advocates of criminal justice reform. After all, in a world without the death penalty, Davis probably wouldn’t have been retried or exonerated. His appeals would still have been denied, he would have spent the rest of his life in prison, and far fewer people would have known or cared about his fate.

[…]

Read the full story here: The New York Times

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1 Comment

Filed under capital punishment, Judicial System, penal system, USA

One response to “Justice, After Troy Davis – NYTimes.com

  1. Pit

    Ross Douthat’s thoughtful article certainly touches some really important questions: well worth reading.

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