Tag Archives: census

Inconvenient Income Inequality – NYTimes.com

Inconvenient Income Inequality – NYTimes.com.

Op-Ed Columnist

Inconvenient Income Inequality

Is income inequality becoming the new global warming? In other words, is this another case where the facts of an existential threat lose traction among a weary American public as deniers attempt to reduce them to partisan opinions?

It’s beginning to seem so.

A Gallup poll released on Thursday found that, after rising rather steadily for the past two decades, the percentage of Americans who said that the country is divided into “haves” and “have-nots” took the largest drop since the question was asked.

This happened even as the percentage of Americans who grouped themselves under either label stayed relatively constant. Nearly 6 in 10 Americans still see themselves as the haves, while only about a third see themselves as the have-nots. The numbers have been in that range for a decade.

This is the new American delusion. The facts point to a very different reality.

[…]

Read the full story here: The New York Times

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Census: 1 in 2 Americans are Poor or Low Income

Census: 1 in 2 Americans are Poor or Low Income.

Census: Half of Americans are Poor or Low Income

New data shows that more and more Americans are falling into poverty.

New census data gives some confirmation to the notion of a disappearing middle class: Nearly 1 in 2 Americans are now officially either low income or impoverished, the Associated Press reports.
[…]
Read the full story here: Slate Magazine

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Texas Two-Step – NYTimes.com

Texas Two-Step – NYTimes.com.

December 14, 2011, 11:50 pm

Texas Two-Step

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Filed under blacks, discrimination, election laws, elections, Hispanics, immigration, minorities, States, Texas, USA, voter ID, voter turnout, voting fraud, voting rights

Young Hispanic population key to futures of Texas and U.S., demographers contend | Texas on the Potomac | a Chron.com blog

Young Hispanic population key to futures of Texas and U.S., demographers contend | Texas on the Potomac | a Chron.com blog.

Young Hispanic population key to futures of Texas and U.S., demographers contend

Texas’ young and rapidly-growing Hispanic population is the key to the state’s long-term growth – and policy makers should find a way to prepare the demographic group to replace older, retiring workers.

Demographic scientists pitched that conclusion at a presentation and discussion Tuesday in Washington, D.C.

The presentation, entitled “Progress 2050: New Ideas for a Diverse America,” was hosted by the liberal think tank Center for American Progress.

The presenters pointed to data obtained from the 2010 Census, which showed a large increase in the Hispanic population, especially among children and a rapidly-aging white population.

[…]

Read the full story here: The Houston Chronicle

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For Jobs, It’s War – NYTimes.com

For Jobs, It’s War – NYTimes.com.

Op-Ed Columnist

For Jobs, It’s War

The American political discussion has finally turned to the right target: jobs.

[…]

To understand just how overdue it is, one need look no further than the absolutely dreadful data issued this week by the Census Bureau about the increasing numbers of people falling into poverty. No matter how you slice it, it’s bloody.

There are now 46.2 million poor Americans.

Of those, 2.6 million fell into poverty last year.

At 15.1 percent, the poverty rate is at its highest since 1993.

[…]

And it’s not that most of these people don’t have jobs. It’s that they don’t have good jobs that pay enough to push them out of poverty. Three out of four of those below the poverty line work: half have full-time jobs, a quarter work part time. Only a quarter do not work at all.

[…]

Read the full story here: The New York Times

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The Mexican-American Boom: Births Overtake Immigration – Pew Hispanic Center

The Mexican-American Boom: Births Overtake Immigration – Pew Hispanic Center.

Births have surpassed immigration as the main driver of the dynamic growth in the U.S. Hispanic population. This new trend is especially evident among the largest of all Hispanic groups-Mexican-Americans, according to a new analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center.

In the decade from 2000 to 2010, the Mexican-American population grew by 7.2 million as a result of births and 4.2 million as a result of new immigrant arrivals. This is a change from the previous two decades when the number of new immigrants either matched or exceeded the number of births.

[…]

Read the full story here: Pew Hispanic Center

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Election boundaries: No more packing or cracking | The Economist

Election boundaries: No more packing or cracking | The Economist.

Election boundaries

No more packing or cracking

California’s new way of drawing political maps could become the model for the rest of America

ONE lowly state senator from southern California, upon seeing the state’s new electoral maps and realising that no incumbent member of Congress currently lives in a district to be drawn around her home, spontaneously declared: “I’m in, I’m in, I’m in, I’m in,” and thus became a candidate for the House of Representatives in Washington, DC. Other state senators, assemblymen and US representatives were rather less effusive. Several suddenly found themselves sharing a district with political allies who may now become rivals, or facing a much less sympathetic electorate.

This chaos among California’s incumbent politicians is a good sign. For the new lines of 177 districts, released on June 10th and to be finalised by August 15th, were drawn, for the first time, by a genuinely independent commission of citizens, not by state legislators. The panel’s mandate is to make compact, contiguous districts that preserve natural “communities of interest” such as ethnic groups, and to ignore politics altogether. The commissioners do not even have voter-registration statistics or the addresses of incumbents. The revolutionary new idea is that, instead of politicians choosing their voters, voters should choose their representatives.

This marks a dramatic change in the history of American democracy. […]

Read the full arfticle here: The Economist

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