Tag Archives: English

Mark Twain Censored – Follow-Up

More on that subject – including a discussion – can be found in the New York Times.

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invasivores

people who eat invasive species

seen in: The New York Times, Dec 31, 2011

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you’re liking

My idea is that the verb “like” can not have a progressive form, but I found this, “you’re liking the last one already” in a comment in the New York Times.

I have not done any reasearch yet, but to my mind the use of the progressive form seems to be more frequent in American English.

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Laptopistan

the coffee shop cafe writing scene

found in: The New York Times, Dec. 5, 2010

On the whole, quite an interesting article, dealing with those people who seem to sit at a coffee shop table for hours on end, typing away on their laptops. I recently noticed that at Starbucks here in San Antonio, at the Quarry Market. There, nearly every table was occupied – and thus blocked – by just one person, not consuming anytning, but using their laptops.

I do like that word!

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demisemiseptcentennial

“one-half of one-half of 700 years”

found in: Texas Highways Magazine, Oct. 2010, p. 9 [in an article about the 175th anniversary of the Texas revolution]

What a word! And why choose 700 years as a base? That seems strange to me. 500 or 1,000 would make more sense, I think. Or why not simply say “175th anniversary”?

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the president’s mustachioed message maven

That’s what the New York Times had recently called  David Axelrod, the president’s chief adviser.

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Winningest cowboy wins in S.A. too

What an amazing language the English language is! As this quote from the San Antonio Express-News proves. I’d never have dared to use that superlative. But then, maybe it’s just the shortness of language required in a headline.

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pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

Now isn’t that a mouthful of a word? Reminds me of Mary Poppins’ “supercalifragilisticexpialegocious” – only that Mary Poppins only made that word up, whereas “pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis” really exists, cf.

pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (NOO-muh-noh-UL-truh-MY-kruh-SKOP-ik-SIL -i-koh-vol-KAY-no-KOH-nee-O-sis, nyoo-) – noun – A lung disease caused by inhaling fine particles of silica. – [From New Latin, from Greek pneumono– (lung) + Latin ultra– (beyond, extremely) + Greek micro– (small) + –scopic (looking) + Latin silico (like sand) + volcano + Greek konis (dust) + -osis (condition).] – Even though we have included the pronunciation of this word, we advise caution lest you may have to avail the services of an otorhinolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat specialist). – At 45 letters, it’s the longest word in any English language dictionary. It’s a trophy word — its only job is to serve as the longest word. In day-to-day use, its nine-letter synonym “silicosis” works just as well. Whatever you call it, it is deadly. Here’s the story of an incident.”

Anu Garg (words AT wordsmith.org)

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Prostidude

That’s what the San Antonio Express-News calls the first male prostitute in a Nevada brothel.

cf. San Antonio Express-News, Sunday, January 23, 2010, p. 15A

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lunocracy

North Korea, as called by Danielle Pletka in The Washington Post

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