Tag Archives: immigration

We need some tough love to get people off welfare and into Pret – Telegraph

We need some tough love to get people off welfare and into Pret – Telegraph.

We need some tough love to get people off welfare and into Pret

Ministers should face down the Lords over benefit curbs – the workers are on their side.

9:14PM GMT 12 Jan 2012

Just outside the House of Commons lies a sandwich shop which exhibits the most intractable problem in politics. Pret A Manger is a brilliant British success story, with its formula of soups, sandwiches and sushi having been rolled out across the country and even taken to New York. But as customers of its London shops know, Pret has another characteristic: its ever-cheerful staff are almost exclusively immigrants. In a city with 770,000 on benefits, this is a sign that something in the economy is deeply broken.

One can hardly blame Pret. What happens in its sandwich shops is being repeated all over a country where the government pays several million natives not to work.

[…]

Read the full story here: The Telegraph

Leave a comment

Filed under Britain, economy, society

The Supreme Court rediscovers federalism just in time for 2012 election. – Slate Magazine

The Supreme Court rediscovers federalism just in time for 2012 election. – Slate Magazine.

Not your Gingrich’s Supreme Court

The Supreme Court rediscovers federalism just in time for 2012 election.

Posted Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2011, at 4:53 PM ET

They say you are always fighting the last war. Perhaps the one place where that’s not the case is at the Supreme Court, where the justices are suddenly poised to fight the next one. When the court announced this week that it would hear a major Texas voting rights case, then took on the dispute over whether four provisions of SB1070—the draconian Arizona immigration law —it positioned itself at the forefront on a new constitutional fight about federalism and states’ rights. Throw in the justices’ decision to determine the constitutionality of President Obama’s health care overhaul, and you are looking at a trifecta of cases that will put the court into the spotlight only weeks before the political conventions open this summer.

But it’s worth pointing out that while the nine members of the court have now been inserted (or found themselves injected) into an election year in ways we haven’t seen since the New Deal, it is not with the sort of  hot-button issues that have made the court a political football for decades. Even though the GOP nominees will continue to rail against the elitist godless unelected social engineers at the high court, the pending cases raise none of their signature issues. That means that as we debate the role of the courts in America next November,  instead of the stale culture war sound bites that have made the court a voting issue for the past 25 years, it will be the concerns of Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party that frame the way Americans think and talk about the court.

[…]

Read the full story here: Slate Magazine

Leave a comment

Filed under Constitution, federalism, states' rights, Supreme Court, USA

Perceptions of Migration Clash With Reality, Report Finds – NYTimes.com

Perceptions of Migration Clash With Reality, Report Finds – NYTimes.com.

Perceptions of Migration Clash With Reality, Report Finds

PARIS — Perceptions of the impact of migration in some countries are so distorted that their citizens estimate that there are as many as three times the number of immigrants living there than is actually the case, a global migration body says in a report being released on Tuesday.

[…]

Read the full story here: The New York Times

Leave a comment

Filed under society, World Affairs

Witnessing the live birth of gangland – Telegraph Blogs

Witnessing the live birth of gangland – Telegraph Blogs.

Damian Thompson
Damian Thompson is Editor of Telegraph Blogs and a leader writer for the Daily Telegraph. He was once described by The Church Times as a “blood-crazed ferret”. He is on Twitter as HolySmoke.

Witnessing the live birth of gangland

It’s difficult to write the words “live births to non-UK women” without sounding like a member of the English Defence League, and God knows what would happen if anyone used the phrase on Newsnight. So let me quickly point out that it comes from the Office for National Statistics, and features in the Government press release that landed on my desk on Thursday morning. “Disconcerting” is the word I’d use to describe the information it contained. Others come to mind, but this is a supremely touchy subject, so forgive me if I play safe.

[…]

Read the full story here: The Daily Telegraph

Leave a comment

Filed under Britain, society

The Mexican-American Boom: Births Overtake Immigration – Pew Hispanic Center

The Mexican-American Boom: Births Overtake Immigration – Pew Hispanic Center.

Births have surpassed immigration as the main driver of the dynamic growth in the U.S. Hispanic population. This new trend is especially evident among the largest of all Hispanic groups-Mexican-Americans, according to a new analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center.

In the decade from 2000 to 2010, the Mexican-American population grew by 7.2 million as a result of births and 4.2 million as a result of new immigrant arrivals. This is a change from the previous two decades when the number of new immigrants either matched or exceeded the number of births.

[…]

Read the full story here: Pew Hispanic Center

1 Comment

Filed under Hispanics, immigration, minorities, news & comments, notes and musings from a big country, politics, Think Tanks, USA

Assimilation’s Failure, Terrorism’s Rise – NYTimes.com

Assimilation’s Failure, Terrorism’s Rise – NYTimes.com.

Op-Ed Contributor

Assimilation’s Failure, Terrorism’s Rise

London

SIX years ago today, on July 7, 2005, Islamist suicide bombers attacked London’s transit system. They blew up three subway trains and a bus, killing 52 people and leaving a nation groping for answers.

In one sense the meaning of 7/7 is as clear to Britons as that of 9/11 is to Americans. It was a savage, brutal attack intended to sow mayhem and terror. Yet whereas 9/11 was the work of a foreign terrorist group, 7/7 was the work of British citizens. The question that haunts London, but that Washington has so far barely had to face, is why four men born and brought up in Britain were gripped by such fanatic zeal for a murderous, medieval dogma.

Read the full story here: The New York Times

Leave a comment

Filed under Britain, news & comments, notes and musings from a small island

It Gets Even Worse – NYTimes.com

It Gets Even Worse – NYTimes.com.

If you thought the do-it-yourself anti-immigrant schemes couldn’t get any more repellent, you were wrong. New laws in Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina are following — and in some ways outdoing — Arizona’s attempt to engineer the mass expulsion of the undocumented, no matter the damage to the Constitution, public safety, local economies and immigrant families.

The laws vary in their details but share a common strategy: to make it impossible for people without papers to live without fear.

Read the full story here: New York Times

Leave a comment

Filed under news & comments, notes and musings from a big country, politics, USA

Migrants run Mexican gauntlet to make leap of faith to US | World news | The Guardian

Migrants run Mexican gauntlet to make leap of faith to US | World news | The Guardian.

Massacre in Tamaulipas by Zetas drugs cartel fails to stem tide of Central Americans risking el brinco – the jump across Mexico

Salsa music piped from the radio and the bus had a name, Teresita,
but there was nothing jaunty about the young men with small backpacks
who filed aboard in silence, avoiding eye contact.

Behind them was home, Honduras, ahead lay the United States, and in between was el brinco, the jump. Also known as Mexico. Not so much a leap as a roll of the dice.

The passengers were illegal migrants and they were bracing for perils which, as they travelled through northern Guatemala to the Mexican borderwards Mexico, could strike at any time: betrayal, kidnap, murder.

Read the complete article here.

Leave a comment

Filed under notes and musings from a big country, politics, USA

meltdown-a-riffic

That’s what Jan Brewer’s [Arizona’s governor’s] performance on her first public debate was called by David Weigel of Slate Magazine.

Leave a comment

Filed under language notes, notes and musings from a big country, politics, USA