Tag Archives: richterliche Unabhängigkeit

GOP candidates would cut federal judges’ power | Rick Perry 2012 Campaign for President– News and updates

GOP candidates would cut federal judges’ power | Rick Perry 2012 Campaign for President– News and updates.

GOP candidates would cut federal judges’ power

Posted on

MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Most of the Republican presidential candidates want to wipe away lifetime tenure for federal judges, cut the budgets of courts that displease them or allow Congress to override Supreme Court rulings on constitutional issues.

Any one of those proposals would significantly undercut the independence and authority of federal judges. Many of the ideas have been advanced before in campaigns to court conservative voters.

This time, though, six of the eight GOP candidates are backing some or all of those limits on judges, even though judges appointed by Republican presidents hold a majority on the Supreme Court and throughout the federal system.

A group that works for judicial independence says the proposals would make judges “accountable to politicians, not the Constitution.”

[…]

Read the full story here: The Houston Chronicle

Leave a comment

Filed under Constitution, judicial independence, Judicial System, separation of powers, Supreme Court, USA

Editorial: We’ve had enough of courthouse cronyism – Houston Chronicle

Editorial: We’ve had enough of courthouse cronyism – Houston Chronicle.

Editorial: We’ve had enough of courthouse cronyism

Updated 10:19 p.m., Friday, October 21, 2011

Just because a Harris County judge doesn’t run for re-election is no guarantee that he won’t be presiding over future cases in the same courtroom. Take, for example, the controversial former juvenile court Judge Pat Shelton.

Shelton has drawn repeated media attention, generally negative, for directing most of his court appointments to attorneys who contributed heavily to his re-election campaigns. One of them, Glenn Devlin, won election as Shelton’s successor in the 313th District Court last year when Shelton declined to run.

[…]

Read the full story here: The Houston Chronicle

Leave a comment

Filed under judicial independence, Judicial System, States, Texas, USA

A Study in Judicial Dysfuntion – NYTimes.com

A Study in Judicial Dysfuntion – NYTimes.com.

Editorial

A Study in Judicial Dysfunction

Harsh state judicial campaigns financed by ever larger amounts of special interest money are eating away at public faith in judicial impartiality. There are few places where the spectacle is more shameful than Wisconsin, where over-the-top campaigning, self-interested rulings, and a complete breakdown of courthouse collegiality and ethics is destroying trust in its Supreme Court.

[…]

Read the full story here: The New York Times

Leave a comment

Filed under Judicial System, USA

Colorful Judge Biery at eye of legal storm – San Antonio Express-News

Colorful Judge Biery at eye of legal storm – San Antonio Express-News.

Colorful Judge Biery at eye of legal storm

Since Medina Valley ruling, he has heard threats and calls for ouster.
Updated 02:18 a.m., Sunday, July 3, 2011

Federal Judge Fred Biery has issued rulings peppered with poems, laced with humor and sprinkled with references to baseball.

He once sent someone to jail for “aggravated stupidity” after the man uttered a four-letter profanity in court. When a prospective juror demanded to be paid $100 an hour for his service, Biery had a counteroffer: a “chauffered ride” by U.S. marshals to a contempt of court hearing.

The chief judge of the federal court system‘s Western District of Texas is no stranger to controversial legal fights, having ruled on toll roads, contamination of neighbors’ groundwater by the former Kelly AFB and San Antonio‘s attempts to regulate strip clubs.

But a recent case has drawn more than criticism — along with threats. There’s also a movement to oust him.

In a lawsuit filed in May by the parents of an agnostic student, Corwyn Schultz, the judge granted the family’s request for a temporary order barring organized public prayer at the Medina Valley High School graduation.

Appeals judges disagreed and allowed prayer at the ceremony in Castroville. But long after the prayers, pomp and circumstance, the fallout continues, with Biery as its target.

[…]

Biery’s rulings can be colorful, quoting from works of philosophy, theology — including religious scripture — and citing even more unusual authorities like songwriter James Taylor.

He occasionally titles them in blunt nonlegalese: “Righteous Indignation Order Concerning Shameful and Unscrupulous Greed by Two Physicians,” for example.

Biery’s summary of arguments in the form of poetry may seem flippant, and his actions to jail those who disrupt his court may seem extreme, but they’re within ethical and legal bounds, observers said.

Read the full article here: San Antonio Express-News

Leave a comment

Filed under news & comments, notes and musings from a big country, politics, USA

You Get the Judges You Pay For

Unter diesem Titel hat die New York Times heute ein Editorial zu der Tatsache, dass in 39 der amerikanischen Bundesstaaten Richter in ihr Amt gewählt werden.

“In 39 states, at least some judges are elected. Voters rarely know much, if anything, about the candidates, making illusory the democratic benefits of such elections. Ideally, judges should decide cases based on the law, not to please the voters. But, as Justice Otto Kaus of the California Supreme Court once remarked about the effect of politics on judges’ decisions: ‘You cannot forget the fact that you have a crocodile in your bathtub. You keep wondering whether you’re letting yourself be influenced, and you do not know.'”

Leave a comment

Filed under notes and musings from a big country, USA

Friends of the Court?

Unter dieser Überschrift befasst sich die New York Times mit der Frage, ob frühere Generalstaats-/Bundesanwälte nach ihrem Ausscheiden aus dem Amt und Eintritt in eine bzw. Gründung einer Rechtsanwaltskanzlei auf Grund ihrer intimen Kenntnis sowohl des Systems als auch der Richter einen ungerechtfertigten und zu hohen Einfluss auf die Entscheidungen des Obersten Gerichtshofes haben. Eine von der New York Times in Auftrag gegebene Studie scheint zu belegen, dass der gegenwärtige “Roberts Court” mit signifikant höherer Wahrscheinlichkeit konservative Entscheidungen produziert als seine Vorgänger. Zu der Rolle der früheren Generalstaats-/Bundesanwälte merkt die New York Times dazu an,  dass diese in früheren Jahren nach ihrem Ausscheiden aus dem Staatsdienst überwiegend Professuren oder ein Richteramt übernommen haben oder in die staatliche Bürokratie gewechselt sind, während sie in den letzten 15 Jahren – mit nur zwei Ausnahmen – Anwaltskanzleien leiten, die Geschäftsinteressen vertreten.

Leave a comment

Filed under notes and musings from a big country, USA

Unabhängigkeit der Justiz (6): Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia & the Tea Party

In der New York Times vom 18. Dezember 2010 [zum Artikel geht es hier: NYT] wird angezweifelt, ob es – im Sinne der richterlichen Unabhängigkeit – gut ist, dass Antonin Scalia, einer der Richter am obersten Gerichtshof der USA [US Supreme Court], beim ersten “Contitutional Seminar” der Tea Party als Sprecher auftreten wird, insbesondere weil dieses Seminar hinter verschlossenen Türen stattfinden wird und damit keine Transparenz gewährleistet ist, und außerdem weil die Tea Party in Bezug auf die Verfassung extreme Positionen vertritt in Belangen, die durchaus vor dem obersten Gerichtshof landen können. Schon jetzt hat Scalia den Spitznamen “Justice from the Tea Party“.  Und selbst wenn er tatsächlich unbeeinflusst bleiben würde, ein “G’schmäckle” – wie dei Schwaben sagen würden, hat es allemal. Dem Ansehen des Supreme Court kann es jedenfalls nur abträglich sein.

Zusatzinformation zu Scalia und seiner Auffassung von richterlicher Unabhängigkeit: er ist derjenige Richter am obersten Gerichtshof, der sich vom damaligen Vizepräsidenten der USA, Dick Cheney, der selber erhebliche finanzielle Interessen in der Firma Halliburton hatte, im Privatflieger zu einem exklusiven Golfturnier fliegen ließ und es kurz danach nicht für nötig hielt, sich selber [denn anders als bei uns kann es nicht auf Antrag, sondern nur freiwillig durch den jeweiligen Richter selbst geschehen] für befangen erklärte und sich vom Prozess zurückzog, als ein Verfahren gegen Halliburton cor dem obersten Gerichtshof anstand.

Leave a comment

Filed under notes and musings from a big country, USA

Unabhängigkeit der Justiz (5): The Roberts Court

Zur Begriffsbestimmung: “Roberts Court” meint den obersten Gerichtshof der USA [US Supreme Court] unter dem Vorsitz von John G. Roberts.

Ein Artikel in der New York Times vom 18. Dezember 2010 [zum Artikel geht es hier: NYT] zeigt auf, dass das oberste Gericht unter seiner Führung (wesentlich) mehr Fälle zur Entscheidung angenommen hat, die die Interessen des “Big Business” betreffen, sondern dass auch die Entscheidungen zugunsten der Wirtschaft [61% unter Roberts gegenüber 46% unter seinem Vorgänger William Rehnquist] erheblich zugenommen haben. Diese Entscheidungen fallen übrigens häufig 5:4 aus, also genau entlang der Spaltung des obersten Gerichtshofs in liberale und konservative Richter.

Der Artikel führt das u.A. auf den Einfluss des US Chamber of Commerce [also der nationalen Handelskammer] zurück, die vor einigen Jahren damit begonnen hat, ganz besonders auf Wirtschaftsrecht spezialisierte Anwälte in Fällen vor dem obersten Gerichsthof einzusetzen. Ganz besonders interessant – oder auch bedenklich –  in diesem Zusammenhang: das US Chamber of Commerce hat im vergangenen Wahlkampf massiv republikanische Kandidaten bzw. die republikanische Partei unterstützt.

Leave a comment

Filed under notes and musings from a big country, USA

Unabhängigkeit der Justiz (4)

Das Thema beschäftigt mich – wie man aus den sich häufenden Postings dazu sieht – einfach ungemein, weil es zum Einen absolut unverständlich ist für einen mit dem deutschen Rechtssytem Aufgewachsenen, und weil es zum Anderen ein grundsätzliches Problem ist, wie weit Demokratie gehen kann und darf, ohne dass wiederum die Demokratie selbst gefährdet wird.

Leave a comment

Filed under notes and musings from a big country, USA

Unabhängigkeit der Justiz (3)

Dass es auch anders geht, nämlich ohne Spenden, zeigt das Beispiel unserer Freundin Stella S. hier: sie hat in diesem Jahr keinen Wahlkampf geführt – es gab kein einziges Wahlkampfplakat hier, keine Annonce, nichts. Nun hatte sie allerdings auch keinen Gegenkandidaten, also auch keinen Wahlkampf nötig.

Leave a comment

Filed under notes and musings from a big country, USA